Short Films & Doco's

 
 

2018 National Indigenous Music Awards - Behind The Scenes (Darwin, Northern Territory)

In 2017, the B-Town Warriors, a group of school kids from Bourke, NSW made a song and music video with DPM called Thundercloud. In 2018, the B-Town Warriors won the prestigious NIMA Community Clip Award for their song and music video. The song is a story of struggle. A brave and emotive production, driven by young people to inspire and support mobs to be resilient, healthy and feel supported.

In August 2018 four young people from Bourke High School took a trip to Darwin NT to the National Indigenous Music Awards to accept the Award.

This is their yarn.

 

 

Payten Thorne’s Yarn - The Art of Distraction (Walgett NSW)


Life can be difficult in remote, rural towns, with kids looking for some kind of direction. Life can also be beautiful, with winding rivers and unparalleled nature. Payten Thorne is honest about her experiences and struggles navigating this world, and gives us insight into the way that she keeps her head above water when life becomes too overwhelming. With a pen or a camera in hand, Payten captures the magic of her town, and uses this constructive habit to channel those feelings into creation. Wise beyond her years, Payten can teach us a lot about how to stay positive and get to where you need to go.

 

Funded by the Western NSW Primary Health Network
Break It Down: Community Conversations Around Mental Health project 2017/2018.

 

Will Hill’s Yarn - Rock Bottom (Wellington NSW)

Depression is one of the most debilitating illnesses around, and no one understands this more than Will Hill. Due to racism at school, and a consequent disconnect from culture, Will found himself in a suffocating “dark hole” of poor mental health. When things were at their absolute worst, Will had a choice. Thankfully, he made the right one, and what we are left with is a remarkable story of courage and strength. Will reached out to his elders and found power in the culture that makes him who he is. Now, he has the honour of teaching students about the very thing that saved him, and give them the strong foundation to get through their lives.

 

Funded by the Western NSW Primary Health Network
Break It Down: Community Conversations Around Mental Health project 2017/2018.

 

Nerida Lorde’s Yarn - Too Many Funerals (Bathurst NSW)


Sisterhood is a special bond that gives you the support and understanding to make it through the tough parts of life together. Nerida and Roxanne Lorde - sisters, have been through some trying times, but have come through it with a gentleness and emotional intelligence that blows you away. In their story, we are reminded that there are too many deaths in Aboriginal communities, and of the strength it takes to honour all those left behind. Grief is painful, and at first, unrelenting, yet when you start to open up and share it with those close to you, like a sister, peace can be found. Knowing who you are and where you come from is vital in this journey.

 

Funded by the Western NSW Primary Health Network
Break It Down: Community Conversations Around Mental Health project 2017/2018.

 

Anne Dennis’ Yarn - Living History (Walgett NSW)


The lessons we can learn from Aunty Anne Dennis go back deep into history. Anne joins the dots between the decimation of Aboriginal culture, and the alarming statistics around the impact of grief and trauma on Aboriginal people’s day-to-day lives. “Something’s got to change,” Anne says, and by this she means reintroducing cultural knowledge back into young people’s lives in a meaningful way. The relationship between mental health and cultural identity is obvious, and can only be solved by valuing and respecting cultural education.

 

Funded by the Western NSW Primary Health Network
Break It Down: Community Conversations Around Mental Health project 2017/2018.

 

Eliza Packham’s Yarn - Speak Up (Condobolin NSW)


It’s terrifying to talk about the trauma in our lives, but that’s exactly what you have to do, in order to heal. Eliza Packham shows us that there’s huge power in saying no to shame. When Eliza heard others openly talk about their problems, she realised that she too could do the same - and she’s grown stronger because of that. Silence helps no one. Stand up, share your experiences with your mob, and encourage others to do the same. It’s the only way to beat mental illness and make the life you want for yourself.

 

Funded by the Western NSW Primary Health Network
Break It Down: Community Conversations Around Mental Health project 2017/2018.

 

Les Coe’s Yarn - (This is) Your Time (Cowra NSW)


When you sit down for a yarn with Uncle Les Coe, you walk away with deepest sense of pride in who you are spiritually and culturally. There is a raw power in his words, and his way of sharing them with you, that plants your feet firmly on the ground. So much was taken away from the Original Nations people by Europeans, and Uncle Les knows how helpful it can be for young Aboriginal people to understand - that their ancestors fought hard to prevent this. Far too many Aboriginal men are incarcerated, and at the root of this issue is bad mental health caused by the deep loss of culture. In Les’ heart he knows it’s time to reconnect with those roots and grow, proud and strong, so that the real fight can begin.

 

Funded by the Western NSW Primary Health Network
Break It Down: Community Conversations Around Mental Health project 2017/2018.

 

Krista Kirby’s Yarn - That Extra Support (Condobolin NSW)


Being a parent and making those tough decisions, is one of the hardest parts of the job. Especially, when you have to speak up about your child’s mental health. Krista Kirby is both a mum, an active member of her community and a reminder that - even though a problem exists, it’s still difficult for people to acknowledge it. If her child was having mental health issues, Krista wouldn’t sit around and wait for help. Her advice to all of us is to have the conversation, and if it feels like the issue is bigger than you know how to deal with, seek out that help to ensure that your child gets the support they need to make it through.

 

Funded by the Western NSW Primary Health Network
Break It Down: Community Conversations Around Mental Health project 2017/2018.

 

Nathan Sutherland’s Yarn - The Hardest Step (Orange NSW)


Going in to speak with a psychologist can seem like one of the hardest things to do, but once you take that leap, you will feel better than you’ve felt in ages. No one knows this more than provisional psychologist, Nathan Sutherland - one of only two hundred psychologists in Australia who identify as Aboriginal. Nathan has lots to say about being supportive to your friends and family, or anyone going through a tough time. Helping each other as a mob is essential, and sometimes it’s as simple as checking in with the people you care about. “Don’t let mental illness define you”, says Nathan. Take that step and reach out if you’re not feeling well. Nathan, and many healthcare professionals like him are here to help.

 

Funded by the Western NSW Primary Health Network
Break It Down: Community Conversations Around Mental Health project 2017/2018.

 

Jen Molyneux’s Yarn - The Road to Trust (Lightning Ridge NSW)


It takes a long time to build trust between a patient and a psychologist, and no one knows that more than clinician, Jenny Molyneux. Through her work providing mental health counselling to four remote NSW communities, Jen can see that there needs to be dedicated support staff in each town, to give that necessary time to build relationships. The Aboriginal youth suicide rate is the highest in the world and that has to change. Jen knows firsthand that before you start helping someone with their mental health, they want to know you, and that’s why she believes in meeting people on their turf and being active with them. There’s a long way to go, but Jen’s insight can help us get there.

 

Funded by the Western NSW Primary Health Network
Break It Down: Community Conversations Around Mental Health project 2017/2018.

 

George Coe’s Yarn - Bila Galari (Cowra NSW)

Chasing the western ideal can turn out to be hollow, and lead to depression, if your spiritual self is not in the right place. For George Coe, that journey brought him back to his roots, by the river where he grew up. On country, George reconnected with the ancient ways that make him who he is today. Now his goal is to provide the kids of his community with direction, while placing the necessary emphasis on cultural wisdom, to ensure they don’t have to go down the tough path that he has walked before. George has big hopes for his community, and his people, and knows that respecting the land is the only way to get there.

 

 

Funded by the Western NSW Primary Health Network
Break It Down: Community Conversations Around Mental Health project 2017/2018.

 

Sam Hill’s Yarn - The Battle (Wellington NSW)


Mental illness is a battle. Instead of fists and aggression, it takes sheer will and determination to keep your mind from falling into those negative cycles. Though, you can’t do it without preparation. Sam Hill takes us through some of the ways one can get ready for one of the most important battles in our lives. Using his might, Sam talks to us about the value of exercise, diet, discipline, communicating how you feel, and most importantly, taking a step back and relaxing. As Sam says, overcoming mental illness is “the greatest victory that any of us can achieve in our lifetime,” and we couldn’t agree more.

 

Funded by the Western NSW Primary Health Network
Break It Down: Community Conversations Around Mental Health project 2017/2018.

 

Gloria Rogers’ Yarn - Two Worlds (Bathurst NSW)


Life as a fair-skinned Aboriginal woman has not been easy for Aunty Gloria Rogers. Being caught between two worlds brings uncertainty, and inevitable anxiety, but Aunty Gloria has spent her life learning how to honour both. At the crux of everything is indyamarra (respect), and it is through that knowledge that Gloria has built a life bringing the two worlds together. The ultimate lesson here is staying true to yourself, no matter what walk of life you are from. When we learn more about the parts that make us unique, and how to express those, our lives can become far more fulfilling.

 

Funded by the Western NSW Primary Health Network
Break It Down: Community Conversations Around Mental Health project 2017/2018.

 

Documentary - Wildfire Munwurrk (Maningrida, Central Western Arnhem Land, NT)

In 2014/15, Desert Pea Media embarked on an incredible, life - changing journey with the Indigenous community of Maningrida in Central Western Arnhem Land. 'Wildfire Munwurrk' was co-directed by and starring Victor Rostron, an incredible songman, community leader and our dear Uncle. This is his journey - the story of one man and his fight to protect his country and culture from destruction. The Djelk Rangers are an incredible organisation that fuse together ancient knowledge, songline, spirituality and land management technique with science and technology to create a world-leading land management program in the Djelk Indigenous protected area.

 

 

Funded by the Djelk Indigenous Ranger Program.